Child Leukemia – Generalities, Symptoms and Treatment

Leukemia interferes with the body’s production of white blood cells. These cells are supposed to fight infections with viruses or bacteria, and when someone has leukemia, they are defective and their number is largely increased, but because they are not fulfilling their role any more, although their number can increase ten times the body’s defense system is seriously weakened and any infection can be very dangerous.

Unfortunately leukemia can affect young children too, and the number of child leukemia cases keeps increasing.

There are two types of leukemia – acute leukemia – a cancer that develops and evolves very fast and it affects all the white blood cells, and chronic leukemia – it develops slower and healthy white blood cells can still be found.

More than 95% of the child leukemia cases are acute leukemia. Acute leukemia can also be divided into acute acute myelogenous leukemia and lymphocytic leukemia acute myelogenous leukemia because there are two types of blood cells, and each type of leukemia affects a different kind of blood cells. More than half of the children with leukemia have acute lymphocytic leukemia.

The symptoms of acute leukemia start with fever, and continue with many infections, because the child is weak against any damaging foreign microorganisms.

When the disease advances the child becomes anemic and begins to have a pale color. He will always feel a sensation of weakness and fatigue which will prevent him from playing outdoors.

All leukemia patients, including children can be bruised very easy, and the often bleed for no reason. When bleeding occurs it cannot be stopped for a long time because leukemia affects the cells responsible for healing wounds.

If the illness is not discovered and it is left untreated it starts spreading through the body and it can reach the brain, affecting some of the senses and causing headaches.

In order to diagnose child leukemia the child must go through a series of special tests. If the result is positive then therapy must begin as soon as possible. First some new tests must be performed to determine what kind of therapy works best. In most cases chemotherapy is used because it has the highest survival rate. Chemotherapy is also accompanied by drugs.

The purpose of the therapy is to heal the bone marrow, the organ that produces the defective blood cells and to kill all the malfunctioning cells from the body. If the therapy is successful it must still be continued because the cancer can re-appear.

In some more severe cases a bone marrow transplant is needed.

The good news is that therapy is getting better and better and most of the children survive this illness, but the survival rate depends on how far the cancer has advanced and on what form of it the child has.

Leukemia and Children

One of the most tragic of all forms of cancer is Leukemia, which each year kills thousands of children all over the planet. Leukemia is a disorder of the blood, the bone marrow, and the lymphatic system. as one would expect with a system of this size, complexity, and importance to the body, there are numerous ways that things can go wrong. Because of this, there are various types of leukemia, all with different areas of activity and effects on the body.

There are a few ways to breakdown which type of leukemia is being dealt with. There are divisions that could be made based on whether or not the patient is a child or adult, for example. But most commonly the division is made based on how the blood cells are effected, and where the abnormality is taking place.

With symptoms that mimic those of many other, milder illnesses, leukemia is a difficult disease to diagnose initially. Some of the symptoms one is likely to experience are pervasive feelings of fatigue, constant chills and night sweats, and susceptibility to infection. As you can see, these are all conditions that could come from something as mundane as being overworked and run down. Many people assume that’s exactly what the problem is, and don’t seek help until their condition becomes so bad that they are unable to perform normal everyday activities without extreme discomfort.

When a person does report to the doctor, a blood test or bone marrow test may be conducted. These are the only ways to reliably screen for leukemia. Because of the variousness of the symptoms, and the invasiveness of the screening methods, leukemia often goes undiagnosed, by some estimates in as many as 20% of all cases.

The classification of leukemia arises from a four-fold matrix of conditions. The first axis is that of acute vs. chronic. In the case of acute leukemia, large numbers of immature blood cells are rapidly released. Since they are not fully developed, they crowd out the productive cells, resulting in quick deterioration of health. In the chronic case, blood cells are more mature and build up more slowly, resulting in a gradual worsening of health.

The second axis of the matrix is that of lymphocytic vs. myelogenous. Lymphocytic leukemia effects the cells which make up the body’s immune system. Myelogenous leukemia effects the myeloid cells, which are responsible for producing the range of blood cells-white, red, platelet-in the body. This matrix yields four distinct forms of the disease, all of which have different degrees of danger and populations within which they occur.

Unlike some other forms of cancer, leukemia is not primarily caused by any lifestyle choices. There is a strong genetic component, which can be exacerbated by exposure to radioactive compounds. If you have a history of leukemia in your family it is important to stay vigilant and aware of your health. There are different treatments available and the earlier you can diagnose the problem (especially with the acute leukemia) the more likely you can survive.

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Defeated With PH Balance and Nutritional Therapy

As a person diagnosed with CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) since 2001, I’ve had my eyes trained on Google Alerts and on the web in general, regularly looking for breakthroughs, both conventionally and in the alternative medicine arena. Many people who are diagnosed with CLL are told to hold off on any treatment, as the disease often progresses slowly, and any improvement with treatment is not permanent. Worse yet, the course and aggressiveness of the disease can change at any time. Patients are told to “watch and wait.” This is not a happy way to live.

No role models. The sad truth is that, until this past January 2009, I could find no reference (not one) of any person who was cured of CLL through any kind of traditional medical — or alternative — therapy. The only exception are those who have been cured by way of a bone marrow transplant (BMT). Unfortunately, many people do not survive the procedure. It is extremely risky. Worse yet, a patient can survive the BMT and still have CLL, or develop CLL again at a later date.

The five-year time-line. Despite all the research and trials, there is still no conventionally-sanctioned therapy (chemotherapy, radiation, immunotherapy, etc.), short of BMT, that can effect a cure. Doctors give patients the hope for a complete remission of five years with some of the available therapies. Not all patients achieve complete remission in the first round of chemotherapy. And the chance of success, measured by five-year survival, decreases with each new form of conventional therapy. Not an encouraging picture. This situation has been evident to me since 2001, when I was forty-six and first diagnosed. Who wants to hear about a five-year life plan when you’re forty-six? Not me! While there have been some promising conventional “breakthroughs,” the survival rate remains pretty much the same today.

The search for an alternative. My search for an alternative treatment, or treatment protocol, has been equally difficult. I have been able to find testimony on the web of leukemia patients who have become cancer-free (acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphocytic leukemia), but no such luck for CLL. At best, there were stories of people who had held off their CLL with the controversial laetrile (apricot seed extract). But no one with CLL had become cancer free. I was discouraged, but I never gave up the search, or my attempt to discover a blueprint to good health.

The 2009 breakthrough. In January of this year, my Google Alerts revealed an article written by Steve Freier, a man with CLL who recovered to full cancer-free health. He regained his health by having his root canals removed and also by taking coral calcium. Because of his experience, I am in the process now of having all my mercury amalgams replaced with safer porcelain fillings. To find information about his recovery, type “Steve Freier” and “CLL” into Google.

Breakthrough #2. In April 2009, while searching for information about infrared saunas and its effect on leukemia, my husband came across this website: http://www.CLLDefeated.com. It is the story of Hessel Baartse, of Adelaide, Australia. He has totally defeated his CLL by means of removing his root canals and mercury amalgams, and by drastically altering his diet and supplementation, with a concentration on restoring his pH levels to a healthy balance. He credits his dentist, www.ericdavisdental.com for his complete recovery.

There are finally role models for CLL recovery. What used to be a complete mystery now is a challenge with a blueprint for success. There are now at least two cases of men who have beat the odds and defeated their CLL by means of mercury amalgam and root canal removal, nutritional therapy, and pH balance. The further good news is that this program is likely a blueprint to health for people with many other chronic health issues, including cancers.

The future. Because of the Internet and the speed with which we can share information, more people will be able to find a way to recover their good health through alternative means.