Symptoms and Signs of Leukemia

A sign can be defined as something that can be recognized and observed by a healthcare professional or a doctor. A symptom on the other hand is something that can be recognized by the person who is experiencing it. These symptoms and signs of leukemia can also be caused by various other chronic health conditions. Thus it is extremely important to always have an unusual check for symptoms from a good doctor. Acute leukemia has symptoms and signs that may be similar to the flu and can come on suddenly within a few weeks or days. On the other hand chronic leukemia has symptoms that can gradually develop and people will then complain that they do not feel very well. This disease is discovered when a routine blood test is done.

Rare symptoms and signs

The rare symptoms and signs of leukemia are as follows.

• Choroma

This is a tumor like collection that consists of leukemia cells and it is present under the skin and or other parts of the body.

• Skin changes

Leukemia cutis can occur when the cells of leukemia cell enter the skin. The patches and sores can be of any particular size and are usually tan or pink in color.

Leukocytoclastic vasculitis can resemble a very allergic reaction on the skin of the person suffering. The sores can usually appear on the hands and also feet.

The sweet’s syndrome includes painful sores and fever that can appear anywhere on the patient’s body.

Blood count

A complete blood count must be done in order to measure the quality and number of the white blood cells, platelets and red blood cells. The leukemia is mostly suspected when the cell counts of the blood are abnormal and the blood cells are not looking very normal. The abnormal blood cell counts may be due to various other conditions and can be extremely abnormal. These abnormal blood counts may be due to various other conditions and leukemia. The blasts may not exactly occur normally in the blood so the leukemia is suspected if the blasts are present. It is one of the important things to remember.

Acute leukemia

The white blood cells will be low, high or normal. The blast cells can also be present in the blood of people who have acute leukemia.

Chronic leukemia

In a chronic condition the white blood cell count is extremely high. The platelet count can also be low and anemia.

Symptoms of Leukemia: Spotting Them Before It’s Too Late

Leukemia is a type of cancer that is very common nowadays. It does not choose who it attacks: men, women, children, adults, Caucasian, African-American, Asian, Hispanic – we are all at risk. According to the latest survey conducted, almost 44,000 people will be diagnosed with leukemia by 2010. It is now 2011. However, with developments that we have had in the aspect of health and medicine, the outcome of leukemia is looking bright. There is now a significant increase in the survival rate – a little over 50 per cent. That might not be a very big number for you, but compared to the 1970s when they only had a 14 per cent chance of survival, 50 per cent is almost like being disease-free. Won’t you agree?

Surviving leukemia would largely depend on the severity of the disease by the time it gets diagnosed. As you could deduce, an earlier diagnosis of leukemia would give a better prognosis as compared to a late detection. Knowing which symptoms to look out for would be a great help in getting the earliest treatment possible. The following would be the most common symptoms of leukemia:

• Fever and recurrent infections. The reason behind this is that in leukemia, you do not have mature white blood cells to combat foreign bodies. You do not have a good defense system to protect you from invading viruses.

• Fatigue. Leukemia is a condition where there is a massive production of abnormal white blood cells. These cells would take up a lot of space, thus impeding the production of other types of cells. Since the production of red blood cells is decreased in the process, oxygen delivery to your various systems would also be decreased. This is what’s causing fatigue.

• Bleeding and/or easy bruising. Bleeding, when associated with cancer, is painless. The same goes with bruising. A normal bruise would be tender when touched. Bruising, as related to leukemia, does not have any pain at all. Platelets, the ones responsible for clotting, are decreased in leukemia. This causes the bleeding and the bruising.

• Petechiae. They are tiny, rash-like spots found on the skin. Unlike rashes, though, petechiae are not itchy. This is caused by the rupture of capillaries and a decrease in platelet count.

• Pain. All types of cancer have pain. In the case of leukemia, it is bone or joint pain. This should not be confused with symptoms of bone cancer, though. The pain in bone cancer is caused by the compression of nerves due to tumor growth. In leukemia, the pain is caused by the overcrowding of blood cells in the bone marrow.

There are many other symptoms of leukemia, but the aforementioned would be the most common of the lot. If you experience any of those mentioned above, consult with your doctor immediately. If you get treatment early in the disease, there is a chance that the cancer cells might be eradicated and you would be one of the few survivors who would live to tell your story about battling with death.

Lymphoma Cancer Symptoms in Women – Be Aware – Stay Alive

Lymphoma symptoms and especially lymphoma cancer symptoms in women are easy to be missed. It is so, because they can be taken for standard discomfort, to which we women are so familiar with by the default of being female.

Lymphoma is a form of cancer of the lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell.

Because our knowledge about this disease is so limited, it comes to be even more dangerous.

Let me share with you what my friend told me about her condition. “At first, I started losing weight. I was so glad to see it happen; we all know how hard it is to lose weight in our age (after 50). The next – somewhat unusual for me condition – was heavy sweating, especially at night. I didn’t think twice about this though, it was winter time, I was probably too hot in general from the combination of keeping the house warm and using a heavy comforter, so I thought. You know, we always find an answer if and when we want to. Another day I noticed, my skin was itching; I had an explanation here as well; it must have been something wrong with the soap. Another incident of lymphoma symptoms I did not recognize, another unpremeditated excuse minimizing the seriousness of the situation. It was not until I noticed blood while coughing, when I decided to see my doctor”.

Why this story? To help you recognize the limited knowledge about the lymphoma symptoms leading to a very late diagnosis, diagnosis at a very advanced stage of cancer. Should the lymphoma cancer symptoms have been diagnosed early, the condition could be put in regression, if not totally cured. It is not the ignorance though. The difficulty in recognizing lymphoma cancer symptoms is coming from the fact that the same symptoms are very “common” to other, not necessarily serious conditions.

Let’s concentrate on lymphoma symptoms in women. What are they?

First and most common of all are the swollen lymph nodes, caused by the lymphoma cancer cells. This can be noticed mainly in the armpits, neck and groin. The nodes are quickly noticeable because of their location near to the skin surface and not so due to pain.

The next symptom is a rapid and unintentional loss of weight. Fever and night sweats, fatigue as well as problems with breathing continue the list. Since these symptoms very closely resemble infection symptoms, a lot of patients are being incorrectly treated for such instead of the true cause – lymphoma.

Mentioned here are only the few lymphoma symptoms in women. There are at least fifteen of them, which women can easily neglect, because we are so used to different kinds of discomforts being women. The list continues with abdominal pain, headaches, weakness and swelling of arms and legs, bowel obstruction, shortness of breath, coughing.

In conclusion, our strong recommendation is to see an oncologist if such symptoms stay unchanged (hopefully not getting any worse) for two – three weeks. It is in the patient’s best interest to check it out. With a series of tests the presence or absence of lymphoma can be easily diagnosed; the sooner the diagnosis, the better chances of survival. And – if there is nothing wrong, the peace of mind gained after such visit is just priceless.